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Make A Self-Contained Compact Cooking Kit

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Make A Self-Contained Compact Cooking Kit

Want fresh ideas for simpler more economical ways to cook when you’re living off the grid?

Look into the cheap and powerful homemade backpacking stoves used by inventive campers like this guy. They’re made to be easy to assemble from common items in your recycling bin for just a few bucks at most, and they run off alcohol or free wooden twigs you find lying around. All in all, much quicker and more efficient than setting up a whole campfire just to boil some water!

But what if you live in a camper like me?

As a matter of fact, my truck camper’s cooking system is designed around backpacking principles exactly like the ones you see in the video!

When building a small camper, you want to keep things small and light. There’s so little space inside that you’ll do yourself a huge favor if you can find ways to eliminate unnecessarily bulky items. And when you apply backpacking principles to your cooking, you can really boost the overall efficiency of your operation.

For instance…

  • Small lightweight cook pots will heat up much faster than your standard household pots, saving you lots of fuel. I personally use an anodized aluminum backpacking cook set that fits inside a 1 lb. coffee can sized ditty bag (about the same size as in the video). While I often use “bowls” (that are actually just those little plastic “Twist n’ Loc” food storage containers), I’ll just as often eat straight out of the pots.
  • While I do have a small homemade “range” made out of a portable propane burner for when I need to cook inside, I’ll more often cook outside on my mobile workbench using a wood gasifying version of the Hobo Stove from the video. And likewise, it’s made to compactly nest together into a 1 lb. coffee can sized ditty bag for storage.
  • You might not think you have any use for a “wind screen” when you’re cooking inside your camper, but you’d be wrong! A metal “wind screen” serves double-duty as a heat-reflector, containing the heat close to the pot so as to dramatically improve your fuel efficiency, allowing you to get considerably more usage out of every ounce of fuel, whether it be propane, butane, alcohol, white gas, or wood.
  • Use a lid! Even a simple lid made from a tin can or cut of aluminum foil will improve your cooking time and conserve more fuel.
  • Little alcohol burning stoves like the DIY Pop Can Stove in the video are really handy to have around as clean-burning backups that can be used indoors (with proper ventilation of course). Backpackers love them because they pack light and tiny along with a few ounces of fuel (denatured alcohol from the paint section), so you can easily use them for day-hikes.
  • There are even great lessons in backpackers’ food choices. When prepping for long trips, ultralight hikers focus on foods that are lightweight, easy to prepare, and don’t require any special storage arrangements like refrigeration to stay edible. So they’ll typically pack 1) dry foods that can be eaten as is, like trail mix and crackers, 2) dry foods that can be cooked or reconstituted with water, like noodles or freeze dried foods, 3) heat-and-serve meals like MRE’s — which are basically the same as canned meals but in a pouch rather than difficult-to-pack tin cans. The lesson is that by focusing on these types of foods, along with vegetables and other foods that don’t require refrigeration, you can dramatically reduce your energy requirements. (ex. Vegans have it easiest, because animal products almost always require full refrigeration, whereas uncooked plant-based foods generally do not.)
  • The pot cozy in the video isn’t just for keeping your coffee warm. You can also use a good cozy instead of “simmering”, saving a lot of fuel. (Not shown: You can use a thermal food jar stuffed into a sleeping bag when you need to simmer for a really long time. I do this all the time to cook rice. It’s called “thermal cooking.” Instead of boiling and then simmering for a half-hour, I just spend four minutes boiling, then stuff it all into the center of the roll and pull it out a few hours later completely done and still steaming.

The Takeaway Lesson (Big Hint!):

If you’re a vehicle camper and want to reduce your boondocking expenses, look into what backpackers do. Not necessarily the ones who spend thousands on equipment (though you can get ideas from them too), but specifically research “DIY backpacking gear”. What I’ve learned has been invaluable.


P.S. That chair he's sitting on, the one he calls the "Amazing Wilderness Camp Chair", is also part of it! It's a clever piece of fabric that takes up zero space in his pack, but is designed so that he can use it to quickly construct a tripod hammock chair out of four branches wherever he goes. Gotta love it!


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Comments

  • Ray Lowrey
    July 23, 2016

    One thing I bought at Wal-Mart for less than $5.00 was an aluminum stove which uses the bio-type of fuel for about the same $5.00. The stove folded flat and had a grill on it. Was great for doing several hot dogs at one time. My other prepping stuff (soda can burners and such) were in storage and too deep to dig out. Next time…will have all of this stuff in one of those plastic tubs used to store stuff. Note…make sure you pick up your solid alcohol fuel at the dollar store when you run across them. The local dollar store didn’t have these and didn’t feel like spend three times as much at other places.

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